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The Rutgers DSW Program
Module Title:
What is Addiction?
Instructor: Jeffrey Longhofer, PhD., LCSW
Residency: Module I: Friday, February 20th, 1:00-4:00pm
Module II: Sunday, February 22, 9:00-12:00
Module III: Sunday, February 22, 1:00-4:00


Module Description:
It is increasingly necessary for clinical social workers and those practicing with ‘addicted’ clients to consider not only psychological and biological factors. We must also carefully explore the social implications of our clinical work and the ways in which it is shaped by history, cultural contexts, social class and inequality. Moreover, too often we assume that social and natural scientists are studying different things: biologists study the neurochemistry of addiction and social scientists are concerned with the related psychological and social problems rooted in biological events. In this first module on addiction we will focus our attention on how our understandings of addiction have changed. In the second module, we will consider how addiction has been studied.

These modules will be led by students and conducted as seminars (i.e., no lecturing). Your reading/seminar group can be found on the attached page, along with the guidelines for the presentation of the articles. You should take 1 hour for the presentation of each article and allow thirty minutes for discussion.

I have created a resource page on my website: jeffreylonghofer.com. You will see a tab, students, and a link to the addiction page: history of addiction, treating addiction, expansion of addiction. Please use the website to explore additional readings.

Module Objectives:

    Module Readings (Required)
    :

    Module 1: Friday, February 20th, 1-4:00: The Emergence and Transformation of the Addiction Paradigm

    Campbell, N. D. (2010). Toward a critical neuroscience of addiction’.
    BioSocieties5(1), 89-104.

    Reinarman, C. (2005). Addiction as accomplishment: The discursive construction of disease. 
    Addiction Research & Theory13(4), 307-320.

    Module II: Sunday, February 22, 9-12:00: The Ethnography of Addiction

    Bourgois, P. (2000). Disciplining addictions: the bio-politics of methadone and heroin in the United States. 
    Culture, medicine and psychiatry24(2), 165-195.

    Garcia, A. (2008). The elegiac addict: History, chronicity, and the melancholic subject. 
    Cultural Anthropology23(4), 718-746.


    Module III: Sunday, February 22, 1-4:00 The Phenomenology of Addiction

    Kemp, R. (2011). The symbolic constitution of addiction: Language, alienation, ambivalence. 
    Health, 16(4), 43-447.

    Keane, H. (2004). Disorders of desire: Addiction and problems of intimacy.
    Journal of Medical Humanities25(3), 189-204.


    The Reading Memos and Organization of the Seminar

    In order for the seminar to run smoothly, you should structure your memo around the elaboration of key concepts and questions. For your assigned readings (see group listed below) you are required to prepare a brief analytical (1 page, 2-3 paragraphs, single-spaced) memo. The memo, however, should not be comprised of long lists of unelaborated questions. The aim is to pose focused questions that will serve as the basis for organizing the seminar discussion. It is also entirely appropriate for you to focus questions on ideas, arguments, or passages that demand clarification. Clarifying questions are often the most useful and lead to especially good seminars.
    Memos should be emailed to me (i.e., word attachments)
    no later than 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday night before the February residency. Send copies of your memos to each member of the cohort. You should come prepared to lead the seminar discussion using the memo as a guideline.
    Finally, the seminar will work
    if and only if you complete all of the readings. However, you are responsible for only one memo—assigned to you according to the groups listed below.

    Seminar Groups

    Module I: Friday, February 20, 1-4:00
    Group 1. Campbell, N. D. (2010). Toward a critical neuroscience of addiction’.
    BioSocieties5(1), 89-104.
    Tim Vermillion
    Melody Midoneck
    Elizabeth Figueroa
    Clara West

    Group 2. Reinarman, C. (2005). Addiction as accomplishment: The discursive construction of disease. 
    Addiction Research & Theory13(4), 307-320.

    Jude Webster
    Louis Gomez
    Juan Rios


    Module II: Sunday, February 22, 9-12:00: The Ethnography of Addiction

    Group 3. Bourgois, P. (2000). Disciplining addictions: the bio-politics of methadone and heroin in the United States. 
    Culture, medicine and psychiatry24(2), 165-195.

    Kimberly Stolow
    Peter Przeradski
    Caitlin Simpson

    Group 4. Garcia, A. (2008). The elegiac addict: History, chronicity, and the melancholic subject. 
    Cultural Anthropology23(4), 718-746.

    Jean Hager
    Stephen Oreski
    Jessica Verdicchio


    Module III: Sunday, February 22, 1-4:00 The Phenomenology of Addiction

    Group 5. Kemp, R. (2011). The symbolic constitution of addiction: Language, alienation, ambivalence. 
    Health, 16(4), 43-447.

    Eric Williams
    Patricia Hecht
    John Wallace
    Ralph Cuseglio


    Group 6. Keane, H. (2004). Disorders of desire: Addiction and problems of intimacy.
    Journal of Medical Humanities25(3), 189-204.

    Debbie Ruisard
    Irma Sandoval-Arocho
    Alice Foulkes-Garcia