CRITICAL ADDICTION THEORY
Below you will find theoretical essays. These authors explore the key ideas and assumptions underlying addiction research and practice. Below you will find theoretical essays. My purpose here is to expose you to literature and thinking that you’ll not likely find among those committed to the party line. If we fail to read beyond the existing neuropharmaphantasy (my neologism) we are left with what I call the CE-Workshop approach. These are generally presented by practitioners committed to a singular approach or understanding. And more often than not the CE-Workshop approach to dissemination of knowledge is myopic and naive. I invite you to help me expand this list.


Bancroft, A. (2009). Drugs, intoxication and society. New York: Polity.
Campbell, N. D. (2007).
Discovering addiction: The science and politics of substance abuse research. University of Michigan Press.
Campbell, N. D. (2012). Medicalization and Biomedicalization: Does the Diseasing of Addiction Fit the Frame?.
Critical Perspectives on Addiction. Advances in Medical Sociology, 14, 3-25.
Denizet-Lewis, B. (2006). An anti-addiction pill.
The New York Times Magazine.
Dussauge, I. (2014). Sex, cash and neuromodels of desire.
BioSocieties.
Granfield, R., & Reinarman, C. (Eds.). (2014).
Expanding Addiction: Critical Essays. London: Routledge.
Meurk, C., Hall, W., Morphett, K., Carter, A., & Lucke, J. (2013). What does ‘acceptance’mean? Public reflections on the idea that addiction is a brain disease.
BioSocieties, 8(4), 491-506.
Singer, M. (2012). Anthropology and addiction: an historical review.
Addiction,107(10), 1747-1755.
Lee, B. K. (2012). Addiction: A Runaway Phenomenon of Our Time? J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 1: 1.
of, 2, 2.
Kalkhoff, W., Thye, S. R., & Lawler, E. J. (Eds.). (2012).
Critical Perspectives on Addiction (Vol. 14). Emerald Group Publishing.
Keane, H. (2004). Disorders of desire: Addiction and problems of intimacy.
Journal of Medical Humanities, 25(3), 189-204.
Kemp, R. (2011). The worlding of addiction.
The Humanistic Psychologist,39(4), 338-347.
Marshall, M., Ames, G. M., & Bennett, L. A. (2001). Anthropological perspectives on alcohol and drugs at the turn of the new millennium.
Social science & medicine, 53(2), 153-164.
McCullough, L., & Anderson, M. (2012). Agency lost and recovered: A social constructionist approach to smoking addiction and recovery.
Addiction Research & Theory, 21(3), 247-257.
Hirschman, E. C. (1992). The consciousness of addiction: Toward a general theory of compulsive consumption.
Journal of Consumer Research, 155-179.
Reinarman, C. (2005). Addiction as accomplishment: The discursive construction of disease.
Addiction Research & Theory, 13(4), 307-320.
O’Connor, C., & Joffe, H. (2013). How has neuroscience affected lay understandings of personhood? A review of the evidence.
Public Understanding of Science, 22(3), 254-268.
Oldani, M., Ecks, S., & Basu, S. (2014). Anthropological Engagements with Modern Psychotropy.
Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, 38(2), 174-181.
Rhodes, T. (2009). Risk environments and drug harms: a social science for harm reduction approach.
International Journal of Drug Policy, 20(3), 193-201.
Strobbe, S., & Kurtz, E. (2012). Narratives for recovery: Personal stories in the ‘Big Book’of Alcoholics Anonymous.
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery,7(1), 29-52.
Vrecko, S. (2010). Birth of a brain disease: Science, the state and addiction neuropolitics.
History of the Human Sciences, 23(4), 52-67.
Meurk, C., Hall, W., Morphett, K., Carter, A., & Lucke, J. (2013). What does ‘acceptance’mean? Public reflections on the idea that addiction is a brain disease.
BioSocieties, 8(4), 491-506.
Buchman, D. Z., Illes, J., & Reiner, P. B. (2011). The paradox of addiction neuroscience.
Neuroethics, 4(2), 65-77.


Special Issue of Biosocieties
Acker, C. J. (2010). How crack found a niche in the American ghetto: The historical epidemiology of drug-related harm. BioSocieties, 5(1), 70-88.
Campbell, N. D. (2010). Toward a critical neuroscience of ‘addiction’.
BioSocieties, 5(1), 89-104.
Meurk, C., Hall, W., Morphett, K., Carter, A., & Lucke, J. (2013). What does ‘acceptance’mean? Public reflections on the idea that addiction is a brain disease.
BioSocieties, 8(4), 491-506.
Rasmussen, N. (2010). Maurice Seevers, the stimulants and the political economy of addiction in American biomedicine.
BioSocieties, 5(1), 105-123.
Vrecko, S. (2010). ‘Civilizing technologies’ and the control of deviance.
BioSocieties, 5(1), 36-51.
Davis, J. E. (2010). The Miltown era.
BioSocieties, 5(1), 149-153.
Windle, M. (2010). A multilevel developmental contextual approach to substance use and addiction.
BioSocieties, 5(1), 124-136.

Historical Essays and Books
DuPont, R. L. (2009). Reflections on the early history of National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA): Implications for today.
Journal of Drug Issues, 39(1), 5-14.